Journalism

Witnessing the economic crisis: Citizen journalism in Belarus

Witnessing the economic crisis: Citizen journalism in Belarus

Mar 1, 2012
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Citizen journalism is a great way of getting facts and local news directly from the source–from the community itself. This information can always be processed and published later by the professional journalists. However in Belarus, citizen journalism has yet to take off. Read More »

Bishkek cuts access to regional news site

Bishkek cuts access to regional news site

Feb 23, 2012
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Acting on an eight-month-old resolution passed by Kyrgyzstan’s parliament, a state-run Internet company has blocked one of the region’s top independent news sites, according to Radio Free Europe.

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Internet trolls a sign of the times for Central Asia?

Internet trolls a sign of the times for Central Asia?

As if censorship, blocked access, possible arrest, and even retaliation weren’t bad enough, now Internet users in Central Asia apparently have a new scourge to deal with in their fight to have their voices heard: the dreaded Internet troll. Read More »

YouTube used to expose electoral violations in Russia

YouTube used to expose electoral violations in Russia

Feb 17, 2012
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Unlike in Belarus where the electoral commission members never raise a voice against falsifications, their Russian counterparts are more active. Read More »

How an Azerbaijani aviation engineer could help revolutionize journalism

How an Azerbaijani aviation engineer could help revolutionize journalism

Feb 13, 2012
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Imagine you’re a journalist.

You work for local TV station with modest resources. Your organization doesn’t have a lot, but your team prides itself on always getting a story first (and correct).  One day you’re sent to cover a protest. Unfortunately when you arrive, you’re already cut off from the action by authorities.

Do you hang around waiting to sneak by or get a plastic quote from one of the officers on duty?  Or do you go attach your camera to a remote controlled drone and send it in for a bird’s-eye view of the action? A new industry–that’s literally just taking off–could make that second option a reality for any news organization or freelance journalist, no matter the size of their budget.  Read More »

A multimedia newsroom for the future takes shape in Georgia

A multimedia newsroom for the future takes shape in Georgia

Feb 9, 2012
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A new newsroom opening soon in Tbilisi will allow students a chance to have hands-on experience with their future. Read More »

Electronic transformation in Moldova

Electronic transformation in Moldova

Jan 18, 2012
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Electronic government is a priority set by the government of Moldova for 2011-2014 and aims to ensure government transparency and citizen access to data and public interest service as much as possible. It is a whole new change for institutions in Moldova, which in recent years have started to become less transparent and bureaucratic.

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Videos stir debate in Azerbaijan

Videos stir debate in Azerbaijan

Jan 13, 2012
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Last week, Azerbaijan’s online population was busy discussing two recent videos. Read More »
Bloggers keep tabs on the Moldovan government

Bloggers keep tabs on the Moldovan government

Jan 10, 2012
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When it comes to voting for the future rulers of a country, every politician tries to send simple messages so everybody can understand them, but when they are in position to rule, their messages seem to be in Chinese. Information about government activity–including the ministries–is incomprehensible, and you can read it over and over and still be puzzled. Read More »

“A Blogger Could Start Russia’s Arab Spring” and other interesting links

“A Blogger Could Start Russia’s Arab Spring” and other interesting links

Dec 12, 2011
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Once again, here are some interesting bits of news related to our coverage region, in this case, Russia, from the folks at CIMA’s Digital Mash Up, including a link to a Forbes profile of Alexei Navalny:

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Helpful Resource: The Digital Media Mash Up

Helpful Resource: The Digital Media Mash Up

Dec 5, 2011
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I’ve come across a great resource for those interested in staying up to date on digital developments worldwide: the Digital Media Mash Up, which calls itself “a weekly newsletter focusing on digital media events, news, and research from around the world”.Produced by the the Center for International Media Assistance (CIMA), an initiative of the National Endowment for Democracy (one of TOL’s long-time donors), the newsletter’s archive can be accessed here and you can find out how to sign up.

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New breakout star of Russian elections: The Internet

New breakout star of Russian elections: The Internet

Nov 29, 2011
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As Russia gears up for parliamentary elections in a few days and presidential elections this coming spring, more and more eyes are turning to watch a new player in the national political scene there: the Internet.  Read More »

Chuck Norris Facebook gag fools Ukrainian media

Chuck Norris Facebook gag fools Ukrainian media

Nov 25, 2011
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To celebrate Ukraine’s national language day earlier this month, Facebook user Fedir Gontsa photoshopped an image of American actor Chuck Norris holding a book written in Ukrainian.  Global Voices tells the story of how that small prank got mistaken for the truth and was reprinted in several Ukrainian news outlets with the story that Norris had met with Ukrainian expats in Canada.

Just goes to show, social media might be a great place to find new stories, but it is no replacement for old-fashioned just-the-facts reporting.

Keeping politicians honest in Slovakia

Keeping politicians honest in Slovakia

Nov 17, 2011
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Politicians have a way with words.  Sometimes they also have a way with facts.  That is to say, they have their way with the facts.  That’s why new sites are popping up around the world to keep politicians honest and hold them to their promises. A website in Slovakia, Demagog.sk, is doing just that. Read More »

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